Women of Northwestern Colorado Oral History Collection

This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tap collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.


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Kenney, Glee Cloward
When she was eight years old, Glee came to the Rangely area with her father and two siblings (1921?). Her mother had just died of diabetes. Her father had worked in the coal mines in Winterquarters, Utah where Glee was born in 1913. Her father leased a ranch near Rangely where he felt he could take better care of the three children. She describes: household chores, winter activities, dances, school, puberty, and clothing. Glee also describes the town of Rangely and what staples her family bought at the one store. She talks about their food sources: meat from cows, and hunting. Glee married Lester Kenney at seventeen and lived on several ranches owned by her husband's father in the Rangely area. She had three children and went to Vernal, Utah and Grand Junction, Colorado for their births. She describes the small school in Rangely (twelve children) that had teachers who boarded with local families. Glee died in 2000., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Kirby, Ruby Lucile Rector
Ruby Kirby's parents (sister is Leona Rector Hinricks) came to the Rangely area in 1898-99. They had three children, Ruby (born in 1902), Leona, and a son. Ruby talks about Ute Indians who visited the ranch. And she describes: home remedies, chores, play, and riding horses. The children had tutors at home and also spent winters in Grand Junction for school. Ruby describes activities at the ranch during their teenage years: house work, horses, picnics, dances, and the family band. She and her sister went to Western State College. Ruby worked in San Francisco for three years in 1927 and then returned home. She married Russel Dare in 1936, but he was shot in front of the Rangely store by a "squatter" when she was eight months pregnant. After having her daughter, she soon married Albert Kirby, a local rancher. They continued to ranch in the area until Albert died two years prior to this interview, but Ruby's daughter and family live on the ranch and she continues to move between summer and winter ranches. Ruby died in 1995., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Knott, CeCelia Sullivan
CeCelia's mother came to Northwestern Colorado in 1910 at about age 17. Her grandfather Sullivan had established a homestead on the Williams Fork River, and later her father filed on a homestead in the same area, which is where her parents settled and raised eleven children. CeCelia talks about her mother's life on the homestead. She worked outside taking care of the animals and helped with haying, etc., as well as all the house work. They hauled water in barrels from the river. CeCelia was born in 1918. When CeCelia was seven her mother was injured by a cow and the children took over all the inside and outside work for a time. CeCelia went to the Pagoda one room summer school through the eighth grade, and then boarded with families to attend high school in Hayden. She had hopes for a career, but married at eighteen. CeCelia had one child. She worked at various jobs in Craig to provide needed income and extra opportunities for her daughter. She was divorced in 1957 and often worked two jobs after that. The job she enjoyed by far the most was as a teacher's aide in the elementary school in her later years. CeCelia died in 2005., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Levkulich, Mary Birovchak
Mary came to the United States from Austria-Hungary when she was eighteen. She was born in 1896. She was the only child of six in her family who got to immigrate and tells of coming through Ellis Island by herself. She lived in New York City, and then moved to Minersville, Penn. where she met her husband, George Levkulich, also an immigrant. They moved wherever he could find work in coal mines. They moved to the Craig area in 1926 and found they had to buy 160 acres because all the homesteading land in Breeze Basin was taken. She tells many stories about: poor living conditions, learning to drive horses, raising 300 chickens, raising animals, growing crops, and butchering and storing meat. She describes "the shack" they first had on their farm and living conditions. Mary had seven children. They had several fire disasters with the chickens and crops. She talks about killing a rattlesnake, and getting rid of gophers. Mary talks about: baking bread in a coal stove, making clothes, and preserving food. She was afraid to visit her home in "Europe" because she would have to deal with the Russian Embassy. Mary died in 1990., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Lyons, Iris Self
Iris's parents came from Georgia to Spring Gulch, two miles north of Williams Fork in Moffat County in 1914 with seven children. Iris was born in 1905. The nearest neighbor was 5 miles away. Her father had a college education and taught at the Wattle Creek school and was also a preacher. Her mother found life much harder than in Georgia. Iris describes life on the homestead: garden, cows, wheat, deer, hogs, clothing, play, puberty, and the one room school. For high school the children stayed in a rented house in Craig while their parents stayed on the ranch. Iris was interested in science and wanted to be a nurse. She went to Denver General Hospital for nurses training after high school. She describes some early nursing techniques and home remedies. Iris came home to marry Wayne Lyons and they lived on the Lyon's family homestead in Breeze Basin in 1930 and had four children. She worked as a nurse when she was needed. At one point they would have closed the Hayden hospital if not for her. Later she worked at the Craig hospital. Iris died in 1999., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Martin, Alta Frances Fox
Alta came to homestead in the Great Divide (Moffat County) area in 1929 from Brighton, Colorado where she and her husband were farmers. They had seven children. Her husband, John Lawrence, died shortly after they arrived. They also lost a son to Mountain Fever and strep throat. Alta found that the homestead was too much to care for and moved her family to a house near the Great Divide Community Center. She and the children worked at whatever jobs they could find: cleaning the community center, working for other homesteaders, and boarded school teachers and the mailman. They raised much of their own food. The children went to school in the summer at the community school. Alta describes food handling, washing clothes, and making clothing. She also talks about home remedies. Alta died in 1984., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Mott, Jennie J. Steele
Jennie's parents came to Rangely in 1926 with nine children. They homesteaded on Little Foundation in 1931, thirty miles from Rangely. Jennie was born in 1930. The family eventually had eleven children, but two died with "crib death," and one was a still birth. Her mother didn't have a doctor for some of them. She talks about her mother doing the work inside and outside the house: irrigation, milking, and feeding cows. Jennie talks about medical care in a very rural area: broken bones, scarlet fever, and the doctor who came from Meeker for emergencies. Jennie discusses big winter snows and cold, and riding to school on horses. Her mother home schooled the children some years. Her mother eventually got her B.A. and Master's degrees and taught in the Rangely schools for twenty years. Jennie finished high school in Rangely. Jennie talks about the house they lived in on the ranch, sometimes sleeping three to a bed in the two room house. Later they built a new house, and the children slept in the old house. Jennie also talks about what they did for entertainment, and travel away from the ranch., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Oldland, Audrey Macy Ruckman
Audrey's mother came to visit her brother in Meeker at the age of fourteen in the early 1900s. She worked at the halfway house between Rifle and Meeker for several years. It was there she met her husband John Oldland, who was working as a guide for Teddy Roosevelt. They settled in Powell Park and had ten children. Audrey describes: her mother's cooking, sewing, the houses they lived in, children's play (dolls), and inside/outside work. She rode a horse five miles to school in the winter. When she was twelve years old she worked for neighbors, cooking and washing dishes to pay for her clothes and school books. She talks about a bad first menstruation experience. Audrey describes home remedies and the 1918 flu which struck her family. She attended beauty school in Grand Junction and worked for a short time in Meeker before marrying John Oldland. She describes beauty shop experiences. She had three children and talks about pregnancy and birthing experiences. The family lived on the Oldland ranch. She learned to fly and was the only woman at that time that flew in the area. Audrey died in 1993., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Paploulas, Leona
Leona was born in Greece, coming to America in 1913 when she was eight years old. She talks about: Ellis Island ; sheep herding with her husband, John; trailing sheep; cooking and rearing children; hauling water for washing; limited access to church services; other Greek families in the area; good medical care; good health; the death of one of her daughters and husband., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Parks, Nellie Warren
Nellie's parents came to Meeker in 1882 and she was born in 1893. She had four sisters and brothers. Their ranch was fourteen miles from Meeker. She remembers milking seventeen cows and selling the butter in Meeker, helping her father in the potato field and her mother in the kitchen, and loading hay with a buck rake (which is when they had to switch from wearing skirts to pants). Nellie remembers the visits of Ute Indians to their ranch looking for coffee and sugar. She talks about the rural school in the summer and the teacher who boarded with them. Nellie describes: home remedies, family injuries, the flu of 1918, and diseases. As a teenager she worked at home and did some work for other families until she married. When she married, she and her husband, George Parks, worked on several ranches and raised six children. She worked outside and inside and talks about those activities. She describes a difficult childbirth and a "damaged" child because of birthing conditions. She talks about: early dresses, later clothing, and caring for her children. Nellie died in 1985., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Powell, Ila Alma Bowman
Ila's parents came to the Rangely area to homestead on Douglas Creek in 1908. Her mother made friends with Ute Indians who passed through the area hunting along the White River. As a child she remembers: caring for bum lambs, milking cows, irrigation, the garden, planting potatoes, clearing sage brush, making deer jerky, washing clothes, baking bread, ironing, and clothing (dresses). She remembers: home remedies, injuries, 1918 flu, and puberty. For fun they fished, rode horses, made horse tail ropes, went to dances, and visited with neighbors. She went to school in Utah, Rangely, and Grand Junction. She regrets quitting school in Junior High to get married (1927) to Lester Powell. She and her husband moved to Seattle, Washington for three years, but returned to homestead on Douglas Creek during the Depression. They had 10 children. They dug their own coal mine and helped build the school. Ila expresses attitudes towards: working mothers, birth control, children, and not having a career. Ila died in 2008., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Rawlinson, Hilda M. Shelton Fickle
Hilda's parents homesteaded in Dry Lake, fifteen miles south of Maybell in 1916. They lived in a rented house, a tent, and a dugout before they built the homestead. They also homesteaded a second time on Wolf Mountain, further south on Price Creek. Hilda talks about: grubbing sage brush, building the school, homeschooling, description of the dugout, and hauling water. She describes the 1918 flu, death, and burial. She talks about the outside work she did as the oldest girl: building fence, herding cows, breaking horses, plowing fields, mowing and pitching hay. She also describes: types of clothing, transportation, play, dances in Maybell, doctors, pregnancy, births, medical issues, and home remedies. She worked as a maternity helper from age fifteen to eighteen, and then worked at St. Mary's Hospital in Grand Junction until she married at age twenty. They went to California to work on a fruit farm until the depression and then returned to Price Creek to buy a ranch. She talks about difficult years with lack of water, loss of animals, and Home Demonstration clubs. They had one child. Hilda enjoyed painting with oils. Hilda died in 2001., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Rector, Katherine Warren
Katherine's father homesteaded on two, forty acre tracts of a pre-emption in 1891. He had arrived in Meeker in 1882. Her mother grew up on the mesa south of Meeker. Katherine was born in 1909. Her mother left the family when Katherine was twelve and she became the housewife. Nellie Parks is her older sister. Katherine married Ralph Rector, and they lived on her father's ranch for seventy-three years because her husband worked the ranch with her father. She talks about: raising pigs, chickens and turkeys, killing deer out of season for food, and canning garden vegetables. She also describes: washing on the board, hanging clothes, working in the hayfield, milking cows, and puberty. They traveled the twelve miles to town very seldom. The rural school (winter school) teacher boarded with them. She talks about: home remedies, doctors for births, accidents, and surgery on the kitchen table. She describes her marriage and living for a short time in Frazier, Colorado while her husband worked on the Moffat Tunnel. It was very cold. They had two daughters and she describes their births. Katherine died in 1999., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Rector, Stella B. LaForce
Stella was born in Oak Creek, Colorado and grew up near McCoy, Colorado on a ranch until she was six years old when her father died. She had five siblings. Stella's mother moved the family to Glenwood Springs so that she could work and her children could finish high school. The children spent summers on the ranch. She talks about: homemade clothing, working during the depression, and summers on the ranch. Stella married Jay Rector and traveled with him to construction jobs. Later they worked on the Kirk ranch, and finally on her husband's father's ranch, both near Rangely. She talks about her husband's mother, who had ten children and first came to the area in 1898 at six years old. Stella describes: washing clothes, cooking for family and extra help, gardening, sewing, roundup, and needlework. The ranch was twenty miles from town, and she saw few neighbors. She liked the chores outside, but not the cooking. She had four children, and talks about her daughter's education, etc. Stella describes the town library, 4H, and women's clubs. Stella died in 1991., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Savage, Rosamay Hodges
Rosamay was born in 1898 on a ranch near Juniper Springs. Her mother, Bell, lived as a young woman in Maybell and the town may have been named after her and her sister, May. Rosamay's father was the foreman on the K-Diamond Ranch and there were no nearby neighbors. She and her sister rode horses and played with dolls. After her father died, they moved to Maybell where her mother owned a drugstore. She describes visiting an Indian camp at Cross Mountain. Rosamay also talks about: clothing for school, riding, home remedies, and dances. Her education ended after one year in high school for financial reasons. She later went to business college and worked for three years before marrying. Her husband, George Savage, was the chief of police in Boulder, Colorado. When he retired they bought a ranch near Rangely and she joined the Home Demonstration Club. She had no children. She enjoyed textile painting and quilting. Rosamay died in 1993., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Service, Eleanor Rugler
Eleanor was teaching school in Missouri and wanted to make more money by moving west. She came to the Pagoda School in 1927 at nineteen. She boarded with a family, but saw few other people except at holidays and dances. They traveled in the winter by sled. She taught in rural schools at Lime Kiln near Meeker, Axial and Hamilton between Meeker and Craig, and in the Meeker schools. Eleanor completed two years of college and many extension courses. She tells many stories of her years in rural schools: taking her breast fed child with her, her school pet deer, making teaching materials, driving to the schools from Meeker in the winter, becoming a foster parent for two of her students. She married a rancher, James F. Service, but wanted to continue to teach while she raised her children. She had three children and two foster children. Eleanor died in 1985., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Shepherd, Virginia M.
Virginia's father came to Meeker in 1898 and her mother came in 1901. They settled on a ranch near Buford (on the White River east of Meeker). Virginia tells stories about her mother's difficult adjustment to the West after growing up in Virginia. Virginia attended a rural school about three miles away. After her older sister died of pneumonia because they couldn't get her into town soon enough, the family moved to Meeker. Virginia describes her life as a child: play, clothing, travel to Virginia, church youth group, and high school parties. She talks about the 1918 flu: many people in Meeker died. Virginia describes instructions on becoming a "lady" and her mother's "reading club." Virginia graduated from college and talks about her experiences at Colorado College and Colorado State College of Education (Greeley). She later earned an M.A. at Colorado College. She talks about her teaching and counseling experiences in the Meeker schools. Virginia died in 1994., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Sides, Bernice Van Cleave and Richards, Beryl Van Cleave
Bernice and Beryl are twin sisters who were born in Oregon in 1903. They came to Meeker in 1903 with their father, a carpenter, and their mother, a teacher. The women wanted to be interviewed together. Bernice tells of their mother's death from surgery on the dining room table - they were six years old. She describes life in Meeker in the early 1900's: clothes washing, schools, games, women's activities, a "poor farm", and adult activities. She also describes her career as a bank cashier. Then Beryl speaks and talks about the early death of their mother and their relationship to the woman their father married, in part, to care for them. Beryl describes the organization of Meeker's first library by a group of women in 1925. Both sisters were then interviewed and they spoke about: school, play, baking, housekeeping, view of marriage, and coping without their mother. Beryl talks about her marriage to Father Richards and her role as an Episcopal priest's wife. Bernice talks about her married life with William "Bill" Sides, and her career in the bank. Neither sister had children. Beryl died in 1994, and Bernice died in 1990., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Smith, Wilma Gertrude Crawford
Wilma's father arrived in the Meeker area to homestead in 1885. Her mother arrived in a covered wagon with her sister. She remembers coming to town on a sled for the mail. She talks about her life on the ranch: play, work inside and outside, clothing, and washing clothes. And she describes a typical day's activities. She attended a winter rural school 1 1/2 miles away. She talks about dances, sleigh rides, and ice skating. Wilma liked to play baseball - she was the catcher. She talks about the first automobiles, which they had to put up on blocks in the winter. Wilma went to college at the University of Colorado at Boulder for two years, taking French, physics, and English. Then she married and had one child. Her husband died in an accident when her daughter was two years old. She lived with her mother in Meeker and worked at various jobs (housecleaning, babysitting, as a clerk, in a laundry, and in a garage). Wilma died in 1993., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Spence, Jennie Mary Brown
Jennie was born in 1897. Her parents came to the Meeker area in 1898 in a covered wagon. Her father began teaching in rural schools around the Meeker area until they moved to Meeker and had a store. They also started a homestead on Flag Creek. Jennie tells many stories about her mother who: made hats, ran the store, sewed clothes, had boarders, was Dr. French's nurse, took care of other people's children, made funeral shrouds, and "laid out people." Jennie tells stories about her childhood: play, chores, basketball, piano, and riding horses. She taught school for three years before she married. Jennie describes: home remedies, puberty, births of children, and women who died in childbirth. She and her husband, Joe Spence, lived on several ranches and she describes the living conditions in the early years: coal oil lights, carrying water, milking cows, making butter, and making soap. She went on roundup with her husband from September to November. They had two children. She describes a typical day in the summer. Jennie began teaching again after her children left home. Jennie enjoyed painting. Jennie died in 1995., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.

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