Women of Northwestern Colorado Oral History Collection

This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tap collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.


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Stoddard, Lena Ely
Lena came to Hayden with her husband, a teacher, who had been invited by Ferry Carpenter to come to teach there in 1921. Their first child was born at the Hayden Inn. They filed on a six hundred and forty acre homestead, which they maintained for six years. They sold it to an area sheep rancher for enough money to buy the Empire Courier newspaper in Craig, which they continued to run for two generations. In the early years Lena answered the telephone, read proof, and collected social news. They also maintained the area weather station for eight years. Readings were taken every three hours and reported to the regional weather office. Lena talks about: women's clubs, use of sleds in the 1920's and 30's, the sheep trail that went by their house in Craig, newspaper subscriptions paid with local produce, political activities, and home remedies. Lena had five children. Lena died in 1991., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Sweeney, June Marion O'Connell
June was born in Leadville, Colorado in 1904. She graduated from Colorado State College of Education in Greeley and accepted a job in Maybell in 1925(?). She lived in the motel and met a local cowboy, Henry Sweeney, who became her husband. They lived on the land his father had homesteaded in 1896. She tells stories about her trip to Maybell, and her year of teaching. She talks about her marriage, honeymoon, and new home seven miles south of Lay. June talks about: her pregnancies, riding a horse, teaching in rural schools, teaching in Craig, serving as the Moffat County School Superintendent. Her husband did the housework when she was too busy. June relates stories of her mother-in-law, who came from Ireland. She was a maid in Meeker when she met Pat Sweeney and they homesteaded in Lay. She talks the illness of one adult son. June died in 1987., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Vaughan, Chloe Bunker
Chloe came to Sunbeam, Colorado, from Illinois in 1926 to visit her sister. She met her husband, Minford, who had been born in Maybell. They were married in 1927 and lived for two years north of Craig while they bought cattle, sheep, and horses. Chloe had never ridden a horse. They moved to their homestead in Brown's Park on Zenobia Peak, seventy miles from Craig, and lived in a tent until they had the 20' X 30' cabin built. The logs, which they cut themselves, came from the mountain. Chloe describes the furniture, travel by horse and wagon, neighbors, medical problems, and home remedies. They moved their sheep from summer to winter ranges. Chloe describes one summer when her husband was ill and she "herded the sheep." She had her only child in Hayden where there was a hospital. Esther Campbell was her best friend and lived eight miles away. They communicated over a phone line strung by their husbands. Chloe describes the Home Demonstration Club. She also describes creative activities: horse hair ropes, leatherwork, horse blankets, knitting, crocheting, and quilting. Chloe died in 1990., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Villa, Mary Wear
Mary's older sister, Elinor Anderson, was visiting during this interview and contributes her memories of their mother, Bessie Maudlin, who was born in Moffat County in 1896. The Maudlin's were very early homesteaders in the area. They both talk about their mother's experiences. Mary was born in 1925 and grew up in Meeker. She describes the town and her life as a child: chores, clothing, cold winters, play, and music. As a teenager music became a more important part of her life as she played the piano for dances and the chorus. She graduated from the University of Colorado in Boulder in Music. She taught in Sterling until she married. She stopped teaching for a while when she had her two children. Her husband, Martin Villa, was a rancher, and she worked with him on the ranch on the weekends. Mary talks about: puberty, hopes for her daughter, and the Great Depression. Mary died in 1989., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Warren, Doris Stephenson
Doris's mother was born on the trip west in a covered wagon train from Indiana. Doris's grandparents came to the Meeker area in 1889 to homestead on Flag Creek. Her grandmother, Minirva Wilson, told her about the trip west. Doris describes: the homestead cabin, the reservoir, home remedies, and cooking. Doris's mother, Goldie May Stephenson, went to college in Boulder at the University, against her father's wishes, and Doris relates stories of her experiences. She returned to Meeker to teach in the Coal Creek School and in Meeker. Goldie May stopped teaching when her children were born, but went back because of the Great Depression. She was also elected Rio Blanco County Superintendent of Schools, but had to resign because she was pregnant. Goldie May tended to sick people during the 1918 flu, and Doris relates her mother's experiences during that time. Doris grew up in Meeker. She didn't attend college because of lack of funds. She worked in the County Clerk's office, until she ran for County Treasurer and was elected, the first woman elected to that post. She talks about working women and working mothers., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Whalin, Inez Ely
Inez Whalin tells her experiences through her daughter, Ethelyn Crawford. When she was twenty-three years old, Inez married her husband at her home in rural Illinois, a much more settled area than northwestern Colorado in 1912. At that time he was the foreman on the James ranch in Moffat County. Inez cooked for all the ranch hands. They soon moved to Mr. Whalin's homestead on Thornburg near Meeker, a one room log cabin, which she describes. Inez had eight children, but lost one who was eight months old to pneumonia. The doctor usually missed the births. She talks about: birth control, childless women, home remedies, and poetry. She was sorry that she didn't go to college; her parents thought her too frail. Instead, she worked in a knitting factory before her marriage. Her neighbors asked her to teach, but her husband said she couldn't. Inez died in 1989., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.
Woolley, Estel Aicher
Estel's father came to the Meeker area in about 1888, and her mother came in 1898 to visit her sister. They married and lived on the homestead on Flag Creek. Estel was the only child. She describes her mother's life on the ranch. Estel wasn't expected to do any of the work. She talks about: riding her horse to school in very cold winters, play with neighbors, home remedies, puberty, and sports in school. Her parents bought a ranch in Grand Junction where Estel attended high school. She also went high school in Denver. She went to Business College in Grand Junction and then returned to Meeker to work in the County Clerk's office, where she worked for several years. Estel married a man from Craig, Raymond "Ray" Woolley, but they eventually settled in Meeker where she had two daughters. She talks about: childbirth and aftercare. While she worked, her mother did her housework and ironing, and cooked for her in-laws. Estel also talks about surgery in homes - her father drove the doctor to country appointments and administered ether. Estel died in 1990., Oral histories were collected by Julie Jones-Eddy in 1983-1986. Permission forms were obtained at the time of interviews. This oral history collection of forty-seven interviews with women between the ages of sixty-five and ninety-five years of age is the result of a two year project begun in 1984. It was supported by a grant from the Colorado Endowment for the Humanities. In addition to the tape collection, the grant also funded the production of a videotape program which highlights selective portions from some of the interviews. "Women of Northwestern Colorado, 1890-1940: Glimpses of Our Lives" is available at Tutt Libray and other libraries around the state.The original files are housed in Special Collections, Tutt Library, Colorado College, R1000. Audio files: WAV and MP3 were processed from original cassette tapes using Soundforge; a Marantz 221 PMD cassette player/recorder. Settings recommended by the Colorado Digitization Project, Digital Audio Best Practices. Each tape is set at 96kHZ, 24 bits. Images: Scanned from photos and slides to JPEG. Text materials: Scanned to PDF and processed to PDF/A using Adobe Acrobat Professional.

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